Mother-of-two, 33, died six days after banging her head in the shower in fall which caused slow bleeding on the brain without her realising

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Mother-of-two, 33, died six days after banging her head in the shower in fall which caused slow bleeding on the brain without her realising

Post by Admin on Sun Mar 01, 2015 6:55 pm

Mother-of-two, 33, died six days after banging her head in the shower in fall which caused slow bleeding on the brain without her realising

By Emma Glanfield for MailOnline: Published: 09:57, 25 February 2015




A mother of two died from a slow bleed on the brain six days after she fell and banged her head in the shower, an inquest heard.

Kelly-Marie Earp, 33, slipped and banged her head in the shower at her home in Midway, Derbyshire, but didn't realise she was badly hurt.

She spent the following day enjoying a Sunday lunch with her family before collapsing and suffering confusion.

The single mother was later taken to hospital and operated on but died from 'an acute subdural haematoma' as a result of 'blunt impact injury to the head'.

The inquest into her death at South Derbyshire Coroner's Court yesterday heard that it was not uncommon for there to be a 'lucid period' after someone had suffered a head injury.

The hearing was told that Ms Earp had spent much of the day with her sister on July 19 last year before returning to her own house at 8.30pm.

She had a shower, during which she slipped and banged her head, and returned to her sister's home 45 minutes later complaining of a bump on the head.

However, Ms Earp – who is mother to Josh, 13, and Macy, five – thought nothing more of it and returned home later that evening.

She spent the following day at her mother's house where she enjoyed a Sunday lunch with her family and could be seen laughing and joking.

Her mother Caroline Earp told the inquest: 'I remember her laughing when she arrived for lunch.

'There were two cars parked outside and she couldn't get between them and so she'd had to drive the long way round.'

However, after later returning home, Ms Earp was found semi-conscious in the living room by her son Josh.

The teenager came home to find his mother slumped over after being dropped off by his father, with whom he had spent the weekend.

Detective Constable Thomas Wagg, of Derbyshire Police, told the hearing how Josh tried to rouse her in order to go to bed but she told him she believed she was already in bed.

Mr Wagg added: 'Josh rang his father who advised him to leave her where she was.

'The following morning, about 7am, Josh still couldn't rouse his mum.

'There was no response from her at all. He rang his father again. He came to their home address, got them ready for school, came back and still couldn't rouse her and rang her sister Michelle.'

The pair phoned 999 at about 9am on July 21 and Ms Earp was taken to Royal Derby Hospital where it was discovered that she had suffered a bleed to her brain.

She was transferred to the Queen's Medical Centre in Nottingham and operated on but died four days later on July 25.

Consultant pathologist and forensic medical examiner Dr Andrew Hitchcock stated on the post-mortem examination report that Ms Earp died of 'an acute subdural haematoma' as a result of 'blunt impact injury to the head'.

He said he could find no underlying disease that could have accounted for her collapsing in the shower.

Coroner Louise Pinder recorded a conclusion of accidental death.

After the inquest, Ms Earp's sister Tiffany, 25, said: 'She loved to be at parties with the family and friends – she was the life and soul and was the loudest one out of the lot of us.

'She loved her kids. We really miss her and it's not the same without her.'

SUBDURAL HAEMATOMA: HOW A BLEED ON THE BRAIN CAN BE FATAL


A subdural haematoma is a collection of clotting blood that puts pressure on the brain.

It usually occurs as a result of a head injury and is a serious condition which usually requires emergency treatment.

There are three types of a subdural haematoma:
Acute - where the blood collects quickly after a head injury; symptoms can occur immediately or within hours.
Subacute - where symptoms develop between 3-7 days after the injury.
Chronic - the blood collects slowly after a head injury; symptoms can occur 2-3 weeks after the initial injury.

A CT scan can show a subdural haematoma and an operation to remove the haematoma may be needed. Many people with a small subdural haematoma can make a quick and full recovery.

However, in some cases it can lead to the damaging of brain tissues and in the worst cases a large haematoma on the brain can result in death.

A subdural haematoma can occur at any age. However, some people are more at risk of developing a subdural haematoma after a head injury including people over the age of 60, because blood vessels around the brain become weaker, and babies.

Subdural haematoma's are also more common in people who misuse alcohol because it can affect the clotting of blood and people who have consumed alcohol are more likely to fall and hit their head.

People who take anticoagulation treatment, including aspirin, are also more prone to a subdural haematoma after a head injury.

Anyone who has been knocked unconscious by a blow to the head, or who is vomiting after a knock, should go straight to an A&E department.

People who have suffered a bang to the head, but may not be experiencing symptoms, should also seek medical help. Often hospitals will keep patients in 'for observation' after a bump to the head to ensure a subdural haematoma does not develop.



.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 58
Join date : 2015-02-08
Location : UK

http://post-concussion.forumotion.co.uk

Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum